Posts Tagged ‘guitar’

Raymond Toro is a virtuoso. He knows what he’s doing. His first solo album, “Remember the Laughter” is proof of that. Writing, arranging, and playing nearly every single piece of music on this disc, the man proves his meddle as a solo artist with catchy vocal hooks, smart time changes, heartfelt lyrics, and passionate vocals. I don’t like it as much as I like the discs he worked on in the past with a band, “I brought You My Bullets, You Brought me Your Love”, “Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge”, “The Black Parade”, “Conventional Weapons”(yes, I see it as a cohesive album all by itself), and “Danger Days”, as the primary writer and arranger of the music, but I’m still in love with it. The lyrics alone make it worth a listen, but there’s so much more to it than that. 

“Remember the Laughter” is a concept album about a middle aged man finding a “memory box” and reflecting on moments of his life via the contents of said box. Simple as hell, way less bombastic and complicated than “The Black Parade”, but just as heartfelt and almost as effective. 

A few tracks stand out to me, and they will be the main ones I write about in this review. The first, “Isn’t that Something”, is written from a straight up genius perspective when it comes to music. Good structure, a good balance of traditional music and electronic(just in the beginning really), and some of the most honest lyrics I have ever heard in a song. You can tell that the track is about Toro’s feelings after the MCR breakup of 2013, and it really pulls at your heart, especially if you’re a fan. 

“Mama told me I should stand alone. Papa said your better on your own.”

While I do think My Chem was the greatest ensemble of creators in the history of music, I still think that Ray’s parents were right, at least in a way. He’s finally making the music he’s always wanted to make. Sure, there’s none of that magical teamwork that occurs when a band full of separate artists with separate musical tastes work together to create the sonic hybrid known as an album, but it really does show that this artist can stand on his own two feet creatively just fine. A lot more than fine, actually. 

That being said, this record was A huge surprise to me. My favorite guitarist had always played like he was a hybrid of Brian May and Randy Rhoades – but with this album, he goes the pop route. It’s not “pop” like all that Beyonce shit you always hear, but it’s still catchy as hell. A very strange but very nice combination of modern pop music with 80s rock bands, which makes the disc play like a time capsule, and the record’s narrative lyrically fits well into that aspect of the album. 

“Walking in Circles” is my new favorite love song. The lyrics in it are simple, as is a lot of the music, but the thing delivers. His vocal holds notes extremely well, and the entire song is laced with strings that really give the whole thing an epic scope. As far as the guitar is concerned, this one shows the listener that Ray isn’t interested in shredding and showing off like he did with My Chem. He just wants to make something emotive and powerful with his music, even if it’s simple. But, like I said, there are stringed instruments, so it’s kind of a mind fuck that he would make a song that sounds so simple and then add something really complex on top of it. 

So far, the album has been pretty poppy. But with “We Save”, the music becomes straight up rock and roll, namely, blues rock. I can’t help but make a comparison to “You Know What They Do To Guys Like Us in Prison”, chiefly because of the guitar style, but the song still doesn’t sound anything like that one or anything else in My Chem’s arsenal. It’s not heavy, but it’s not soft either-it’s just intelligent rock music that puts a smile on your face. 

Things get more complex a couple of tracks later with, “The Great Beyond”. Orchestral instruments  abound once again, but the real focus is the guitar and the vocals. Melodically, it’s one of the best songs of the album, especially with the soft bridge. I said before that Ray doesn’t really shred on this album – but scratch that, the solo on this song is excellent(I guess he does shred on this album, where the solos are concerned, but he does it sparingly). It’s soft but rockin’, smart, and gets stuck in your head just as much as the vocals do. There’s also a certain highly experimental sound employed throughout the verses that took me a while to get used to, but I love it now, even though I have no clue what it is. Something like scraping or clicking, I guess. 

“Take the World” reminds me of “The World is Ugly” and “the Kids From Yesterday”, but it’s still Signature Ray Toro, not My Chemical Romance. I think it would have worked with Gerard Way singing it, but it actually wouldn’t have been as good. This is the album’s initial single for a reason – it shows with glory Toro’s competence as a songwriter and especially as a vocalist. I’ll admit I like Way’s voice better, but I think Ray’s voice is perfect for this song. 

All the songs are great, but the next one that really stands out to me is “Requiem”. The vocals and lyrics of this record are all delightfully positive, and that infectious happiness shows the most through this track. It’s all about honoring the memories of those we have lost, living life to the fullest, and finding hope amidst the “madness of this world”

“You’ve got one life so make it right. If I had one more chance, I wouldn’t take it back.

Don’t die in vain, please light the flame.

And fill the sadness in your heart with memories of us.”

Just beautiful to the heart, man. Makes me wanna live my life to the fullest. And, at the end of the song, Toro goes full on African with the vocals and percussion. I’ve always loved tribal stuff. It’s just so emotional and real. 

And the last song, title track “Remember the Laughter” is just as powerful and infectious as the rest of them. Great way to end an album, especially with Toro’s “La la la” refrain during the bridge. 

I’ve been listening to this album for a couple weeks constantly, and it resonates with my emotions more than any of the solo efforts of My Chem’s other members. The main focus of the disc is family, and that’s something I desperately needed to focus on at this time. So, thanks Ray.

All in all, a cohesive, well constructed, and just damn good CD.

10 out of 10 

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smalltown

inthese

I interviewed these bands for a planned magazine for my hometown. But the editor bailed, so I’ve decided to post the piece on here. Our magazine is still in the works, however, and will probably be available early next year.

When you want to go to watch a rock band, chant lyrics back at its singer, and dance around like you just don’t care, then OKC is the place to be. Well…it HAS been. For a long time, it was the only place I could go to find shows, aside from an occasional trip to Dallas. But now, our own El Reno seems to be the go-to place for live music. Venues and bar shows are popping up everywhere, and it’s really bringing vitality to this town as well as bringing out the creative energies of our local musicians. Ever wonder what those musicians think about in regards to the shows, the songs, or anything else? Their take on the Reno scene? Look no further. We have two interviews with a couple of awesome bands who will most assuredly be among the first to put El Reno on the map.

First up, we have Cody Hassell, who plays guitar, harmonica, and does backing vocals for the band “Small Town Sound”, a real, gritty, honest, Red Dirt Country band with an awesome sense of humor matched only by the sheer talent they possess musically. Every show of theirs is ridiculously fun. The members are Tuffy Casteel(vocals), Tim Elliot(lead guitar), Jacob Moss(drums), Todd Neece(bass guitar), and of course Cody Hassell himself, the band’s mouthpiece for this interview. (As of this post’s date, Small Town Sound have unfortunately broken up, but Cody still does a lot of solo shows)

SMALL TOWN SOUND

  1. Tell me about the band name.

There’s really not much of a story behind it. I wasn’t there when they created it; I joined the band after that. But it’s pretty much flat out what it sounds like: a reference to the type of music that we play, which is the music that we learned growing up in a small town.

That’s awesome. Just starting out playing shows at bars, stuff like that, with people you know, and then growing from there?

Yeah you know, a group of friends in your living room after school or hanging out in your garage. You know, drinking beer… Wait, no, that was when I got a little bit older… Um.. Hi mom! (Laughs). But yeah, it’s pretty cool to go from starting there, playing at a campfire or your garage or your girlfriend’s house, to having people you went to school with come to all your major shows ten or fifteen years later. Everybody’s like “I knew you were gonna do something with this!” It’s a pretty good feeling, ya know? People think you’re doing something big ’cause of your recognition, but you’re actually still just basically screwing off, doing the same thing you were doing back in school.

I think it’s cool that something can start out small within the confines of a town, like bar shows and whatnot, and then grow to something way bigger while still retaining that personal and authentic quality.

Yeah, most everybody we play with, they are pretty authentic. Of course, there are those one or two people you run across every now and then who think they’re the biggest star on this side of the Mississippi. But they’re playing the same places we are, for the same amount of money we are, and we just usually have to let that go, you know? Don’t say nothin about it, don’t burn no bridges. But for the most part, everybody’s really cool. We have very few people we play with that we have any problem with. It’s a good scene.

  1. What genre would you call your music?

Oh man… We get a bunch of people that label us “Red Dirt Country”. And I think we do have a big influence from that type of music: The Turnpike Troubadours, Blackberry Smoke, Robert Okeen, and that type of stuff. But a couple of us also listened to punk music growing up, a lot of southern rock and classic rock too. So, when people ask me what type of music we play, I say “Red Dirt with a Southern Rock Feel”. We try not to do anything that has been done to death already though, ya know? We try to be unique.

  1. What would you say most of your songs are about?

All kinds of stuff. Most of them are pulled from an experience that we’ve had. We have one called “Outlaw” about a good friend of the band’s, and we have one that’s pretty much about driving back from a show or driving back from work out of state, with your friends back there calling and asking you where you’ve been. We got one about losing a girl, and then another one that was the first one that Tim wrote about his wife. We draw from any experience we can. We try not to overdo the “love” thing, ’cause just about any song you hear anymore is about some significant other. Or, “hopeful significant other” I guess.

  1. Where all have you played, and where is your favorite place to play?

Oh, man…we have played all over OKC, Shawnee, Lawton, Madison Park, Hinton, Okarchee, Sparks, Depew. We’ve been out of state too. Springfield, Missouri; Nashville, Tennessee; Dallas, Texas. Pretty much anywhere we can go. My favorite place to play…that’s a tough one. Almost impossible to choose; I don’t want any venues we’ve played to see this and be hurt that I didn’t pick them…but man, the biker rallies are great. That’s my crowd right there. They are so laid back, have a good time, hoot and holler. Sometimes they get a bad rep and people think there’s gonna be fights and all that, but it’s really such a “live and let live” type of thing, you know? Anytime we play at a biker rally, I like for our band to go onstage right in the middle of the band lineup. Then we get off stage, and plan on sleeping in the truck that night, cause you’re not gonna be driving home, you know? And I can’t pick just one rally. Both the main ones in Oklahoma are just great. We got a new one coming up where we haven’t played before, and I’m really looking forward to that one too.

  1. Who are some of your favorite artists?

I go through phases. Right now, I’m on a big “Passenger” kick. He’s a guy from Britain I think, maybe London. He’s such an amazing songwriter. He can just say things with words and make words rhyme in ways that you wouldn’t think could work. Really paints an image inside your head. And then his guitar playing is unbelievable. Like, I cannot believe that just one guy can have this kind of talent with both writing guitar parts and coming up with lyrics. He had a big hit on the radio with “Let Her Go”. I liked it but really didn’t get too much into it. Then one day I was listening to Internet radio, and another one of his songs came up, and it really caught my attention; like, “who’s that?” And then, “Oh, that’s that same guy who does ‘Let Her Go’.” So I started looking up all his stuff, and here I am a year later. I think he’s got maybe seven albums out, and I own every one of them. And of course, like I said, I’m also into “The Turnpike Troubadours”. I’m also really into the “Hamilton” musical right now, which is a Broadway show about Alexander Hamilton. And it’s a hip-hop musical, a musical with our forefathers up there rapping. It’s one of those things where you think it’s gonna sound like crap, and then it ends up being good enough to give you chills.

  1. What do you guys normally write first, the verse or the chorus?

It’s just whatever we get, whatever happens. Sometimes we’ll just be jamming and tuning up and all that, then one of us will come up with somethin catchy, and then Tim or Tuffy will end up writing a whole song from it. It could start with me jamming on guitar or a line Tim comes up with. And Tuffy, he’ll show up to practice and throw down a piece of paper and have all the words and lyrics right there. I guess we take the inspiration whenever we get it. We write whatever comes to us and just go from there.

  1. How long have you been playing music? Both individually and as a band?

I didn’t start playing guitar until 2000. Now, I carried a guitar around for about a year and a half before that, just trying to learn how to play it, but I didn’t start actually playing until 2000. I started school band in 96, and by 97 I had pretty much flunked out, dropped it halfway through the year and went to choir…cause that’s where the chicks were at (laughs). Worked out pretty well for me cause I met my wife in choir. So I played from 2000 to 2005 just playing around campfires, friends’ parties, jamming in the garage. Occasionally I would play a few songs between bands at the bar my dad hung out at; I’d just jam during the breaks and stuff. Then I stopped playing around 2005, started working a lot, and didn’t start playing again till like 2010. I picked it back up again with a guy I worked with, taught him a few bass licks, brought his cousin in who played drums, and started playing at bars in El Reno for $120 a night. As far as the other guys in Small Town Sound, I don’t really know. The band’s been together for like 5 years now. It’s Tuffy’s first band, and Jake and Tim have been in a few high school punk bands around El Reno, with Mike Randall from “James Bond Dracula”. And Todd’s from Dallas, and he’s been playing since before I was born. He was in some hair metal bands back in the 80s, then he got married and quit playing for a while, close to twenty years. Then he got back on it around 2012 or 2013, which was around the time I met him with the band we both played in before Small Town Sound. He dusted off his bass guitar, met me from Craigslist when I was looking for a bass player, auditioned, and we’ve been jamming together ever since.

  1. What all instruments can you play?

I’ve got an electric and an acoustic drum set, a four stringed bass, can play a song or two on the banjo, play mandolin, electric and acoustic guitar. I love the 12 string guitar. I jam out on percussion instruments too, and I play harmonica for the band. I’ll play anything I can get my hands on. Got a violin that I sometimes mess around on trying to get the hang of it. Now, that’s a frustrating instrument. I play a little bit on the saxophone, but of course not too much or I wouldn’t have flunked out of band in school. I’ve got an accordion too, and the best song I can play on it is the “Gilligan’s Island” theme song.

  1. What has been your biggest moment musically, even in regards to music that isn’t your own? When was your life most affected by music?

The moment I decided to start playing guitar again after almost six years. In May of 2010, I got laid off from a job and then shattered my wrist right after that. Had to have a steel plate put in it and all that…I was sitting around the house, and my wife and family had convinced me to make a Facebook account. I thought “I’m sitting around the house not working so I might as well.” I’m sitting there adding friends and all that, and I come across a friend from high school whose son had bone marrow cancer. He was like 3 years old at the time. And I’d owned a motorcycle for a while and had done some bike runs and stuff like that, and I just thought to myself, “I’ve got all this time on my hands sitting around the house, making a few job applications, so I’m gonna put on a little poker run, make a little money for this kid.” Me and a buddy of mine put it together in this kid’s name, and at our last stop we were playing at this big party, and I had hit up a couple of friends of mine who played music. And the owner of the bar’s brother had a friend of his daughter’s who was pretty much his daughter, she was pretty much his daughter’s sister, and she had gotten really big into music and never looked back. Went on tour in Paris and all that. Her name’s Allie Harter. So he asks her to come up and play, and I had introduced her to the crowd at the party. I’m sittin there watching her play, and I’m thinking to myself, “Man, she is SO good. I miss doing that. I want to start playing guitar again.” I started playing a lot after that. Just pretty much picking it up and remembering how to play it. That’s what made me want to start playing again.

  1. Do any of your personal beliefs and opinions show through in your music?

Well I hope so. That’s kind of the point, right? I find that it all goes back to being sincere. I think the true artists are the ones who go up there, pull open their chests, and show their heart on stage. If you go up there and fake it, the audience can tell. It wouldn’t feel real to anyone. There’s just something about being sincere that makes people trust you, you know? And we’re not ever gonna write a song that we disagree with morally or religiously. We might do one we disagree with lawfully though. That’s half of the outlaw country genre right there I think. You know, you’re not really out their robbing banks and stuff, but you sing about it.

  1. What advice would you give to musicians who are just starting out?

Well…you know how to get to Carnegie Hall: practice, practice, practice. That’s the number one thing. And I could give a LOT of advice. I could give advice I wish I had heard when I was just starting out. But practicing is the most important thing. A lot of people think just cause they jam out in the garage with their friends that they can go up on the stage right away; in reality you have to be a lot more precise up there. There isn’t any room for stopping halfway through the song because you did it in the wrong key. Once you go, you go.

Thanks for doing the interview man .

No problem. If it ends up in the Washington Post or something make sure you let me know (laughs).

Next up, we have “In These Pages”, a local folk pop band consisting of Jeremiah Goodblanket(vocals, guitar), Zak Schroeder(guitar), and John Jones(bass). The first few times I watched them play, it was just Zak and Jeremiah, and what really struck me about them was how they combined extremely skillful guitar playing with passionate vocals. Now, with the addition of John on the bass guitar, they have a full sound and are able to convey even more emotion through their songs.

IN THESE PAGES

  1. What does the name, “In These Pages” refer to?

Jeremiah: I came up with it probably 5 or so years ago. It was the name of my solo project, back when I had had it planned to hit up the studio and track everything myself. And then, as time went on, I just decided I needed some help, ya know? And the name itself really refers to using life as a metaphor, or a book as a metaphor for life. The pages of your life, the chapters of your life. So this is literally just a page in our lives right now. We’ll just see how far it takes us.

Zak: Jeremiah is the one who started the band. I’d been playing solo at the Iron Tree a few times. We had both been in a band before called, “With Cities Below”, and we just decided with “In These Pages”, “Let’s make a duo and really just make the band expand.”

  1. What is your main inspiration?

Jeremiah: Really just life experiences. People you lose, people you love, things you do and things you mess up. My inspiration is mainly my life, ya know? And when it comes to the music itself, the music that really inspires me, like the mood of it, would probably be Lydia and Green Day. But it just goes all over the spectrum. I could talk about bands all day, but really just the music itself is inspired by my life experiences

Zak: Yeah life experiences. Most of the songs are written lyrically by Jeremiah, and I agree with what he’s singing and everything like that. But where I get my inspiration from starts with back when I was younger, when I first acquired my guitars. My uncle had passed, and he was a huge metal head and I inherited his guitars. I greatly looked up to him when I was younger. And so I wanted to be like him and play guitar, you know? Growing up, I was a little five year old listening to Metallica in the back seat of my grandma’s car, so it all started when I was super young and just with the love of music. We would play games with the car radio and try to scream out which song was being played on the radio before anyone else could say the name or whatever. So it all goes back to when I was at a really young age.

John: Inspiration for me has pretty much always been kind of more of a hard core. I grew up listening to country music like Johnny Cash. And there are very few people who have gone through the hell that Johnny Cash went through, and came back to see the light. So when you look at the different inspirations that I have witnessed throughout my life that can be sang and played to, it’s a different style for sure. You have to kind of take a little bit from here and a little bit from there and try to piece it together to make your own style. It’s different for sure. As far as what drives me – the fact that every single person out there has got a story. Everyone wants their story to be heard. So if you can write a song to make their story heard, that’s what will drive not just me, but every single person around me.

  1. Who are your influences musically?

Zak: I’ve been hugely into metal for a long time, really just the whole genre. Acoustic and metal scenes, I’m way into both of those, and I can’t really name names because there are just so many. But one singer-songwriter I’ve been jamming out to a lot lately is “Front Porch Step“. With his personal life, he’s gotten into a lot of trouble and everything, and I won’t get into that, but his music is just really great. I love his albums. So I guess right at this moment, I’d say “Front Porch Step” is my main influence.

John: For me, my inspiration originally started from Corey Smith because I had nothing more to play than like a bass note, and it was pretty awful. I really liked Josh Turner, Blake Shelton, you know, those kinds of singers were my main inspiration for wanting to sing. But as time progressed, I started getting more into the poetry behind music and not just the repetition. I started listening to more of the unknown artists like Corey Smith when he had just started out. He’s one of those singers who doesn’t exactly have the greatest voice, which is like myself, but the music he writes is pure poetry. Even if you don’t have the greatest voice, your lyrics can take you all the way.

So, as far as my main drive, it’d probably be Corey Smith, ’cause he’s a little guy out there pushing forward to make a difference

  1. What would you say is the main subject matter of your songs?

Jeremiah: Mostly love. I guess it’s kinda sappy, ‘cause people are tired of hearing love songs, but love’s the biggest drive in life and what gives meaning to everything in the human race. If there was no love, everything would be like how it is in “The Giver”, you know? It would just suck. And a lot of my stuff is about my current girlfriend and how we have plans for the future. And there’s songs that I’ve written about heartbreak in the past, you know, with friends and family. And recently I’ve been trying to expand our music’s subject matter to reach a bigger audience as opposed to just love. And the most recent song I’ve written is about how fast life goes by and how we all just lose track of it. I had spoken with my grandma a few years back, before she passed away, and she was saying how life felt like she had just blinked and then here she is in her 80’s. Life really does fly by. So the song I’m talking about is kind of hitting on little pieces of someone’s life and saying not to take it for granted, and to focus on NOW so it doesn’t all go by too fast.

  1. How do you guys feel about the quality of today’s popular music?

(all laugh)

Jeremiah: There’s some really catchy stuff out there

Zak: There is, there is.

Jeremiah: But there’s a lot of, you know… Cookie cutter…

Zak: Repetitive. I’ve heard that beat before, I’ve heard that melody before, where’s the new melody at. They just keep on remixing everything. We do covers though, you know? And they are covers of very popular songs, catchy and repetitive, but we try to throw our own unique spin on it. We’ve done acoustic versions of rap songs and stuff like that. But it’s sad to see what the music industry has started to head towards.

John: A lot of it’s not even music

Zak: Yeah, and then you have like a person who’s got a good voice or a half assed voice, and they can get into the studio and modify it all, make it sound good, and throw a generic beat on it. They’ll say something that caters to a specific audience, like “get girls” or “get money”. And even country now, it’s like, “I got a truck, I got some beers; let’s have a good time” and that’s it.

John: Skirts…

Jeremiah: My wife left me, my dog died…

(All laugh)

Zak: Yeah you know that’s it. That’s what’s going on record right now, but if I ever get into that situation with my music, please shoot me

  1. Do any other forms of art or creativity affect your songwriting?

Zak: Definitely. I’m a graphic designer on the regular side of life. In my eyes, all art is just about mood and feel. Art can be from any aspect of your life, whether it be painting on a canvas or messing around on a computer screen, or music. Again, it can all completely affect your life on how you view things artistically.

Jeremiah: Photography’s always been a really big one for me. I’ve always respected the hell out of it. My girlfriend is currently working as a photographer part time, and I love seeing her grow and learn in that because it’s something I’ve always loved doing. Aside from that, you have to really respect the big artists out there, you know, like the Renaissance artists. All the painting, all that stuff. I’m not really too big on modern art or “abstract” per se. But I respect all art in general. And acting too. Where I work now, most of my time is spent watching movies, which makes my job sound stupid. If it’s slow enough, we’ll watch Netflix. But anyway, I just try to watch just really good movies, and I really respect the people that make them.

Zak: If we could envelop people into our music as much as people are enveloped into something like “Game of Thrones”, that would be a dream come true.

(Pause)

Jeremiah: I think there’s a bug in my shirt.

(All laugh)

  1. What comes first in the writing process? The verse or the chorus?

Jeremiah: Usually for me it’s the chorus. I come up with a hook, a melody comes into my head and I just build on that. You know, there’s been songs that I like started at point A and went from there. Like, it’s really just all over the place, but most of the time, if it’s a not melody stuck in my head that I just turn into a chorus, it’s just a guitar riff that I throw words on top of. It ends up being all about simply purging emotions through the words in the songs.

John: For me, the very first thing is always my idea of a music video for the song. I always seem to fit what I’m singing into a music video and watch it myself in my head, to see maybe “What’s this person’s life been like, how it’s gonna end up?”. And I always end up with the bridge of the song first, then the chorus, and then I fit the verses in with it. But it always starts with a music video in my head. I picture what I wanna see, and what the bridge is, what the ending’s gonna be, and then I start piecing together from there what the chorus is gonna be, and then all the way down to the verses.

Jeremiah: I never thought of it like that. But that’s actually pretty much how that last song we played was made. You know, it’s all about my life and me experiencing it. But I think that’s a really nice method.

Zak: With me, it’s really just improvisational. It’s always been improv. You know back when I played at the Iron Tree, I would just show up without practicing anything beforehand. Set my guitar to a specific tuning, and then set a few chords down and just go off of those chords with solos and different melodies. Here tonight, about thirty percent of what I was doing was improv.

Jeremiah: Or sixty percent.

(All laugh)

Zak: Yeah, kind of. You know, playing at Iron Tree and everything has really helped with playing improv, like with Jeremiah and John and me playing off of each other and stuff, we all just kind of resonate off of each other and pick up on what’s going on.

Jeremiah: Yeah we’re really good at playing with each other.

(All laugh)

Zak: Yeah, we play with each other too much.

I’ve always thought ever since I first saw you guys play that it just all sounds really well together. You know, I thought “That’s some dual guitar.”

Zak: Yeah, and that’s what it all kind of hearkens back to. I’ll throw down some chords, and Jeremiah will throw down some leads, and then he’ll throw down some chords, and I’ll lay down some leads and we’ll just switch back and forth.

John: The great thing about playing with these guys is that no matter where we’re at in the song, I can always look at either of them and know exactly which part we’re at in the song, and I can start playing as well. But they play off of each other so well that no matter what, no matter who’s playing lead, it’s so easy to just turn around and be like, “Ok, I’m lost. What are we playing right now?” And just look at them for a couple of seconds and realize exactly where they’re going. They’ve been playing so long together and they’re so skilled at what they do. We can all instantly be on the same page throughout the entire song. Surround yourself with great musicians and you’ll be a great musician yourself

Jeremiah: I hate to break it to you, but we’re not great musicians(laughs).

  1. What advice would you give to musicians who are just starting out?

John: For me it’s a little bit different, because I don’t play guitar, I play bass. I’m kind of one of those people who’s sort of in the background in the band, like I don’t have lead parts and this and that, but if I could give anybody advice, just from what I’ve done over the years, it would be “Don’t be afraid to go out there and get what you want.” I’ve been really lucky to be able to surround myself with really great people, because, unfortunately, there are a lot of people who will try to cut you down in the music business, try to ridicule you for what you think you may be able to do. And unfortunately, that happens quite often. But don’t give up. You know, ten years ago, whenever people said “You’re not good, you can’t sing worth a darn.” – if I had listened to them, I certainly wouldn’t be where I’m at now. But I’ve got two guys here right now who are amazing people, good people, and they took a chance with me. I’m not the greatest bass player in the world. But they showed up and asked me to play, and I played my heart out trying to impress them the best that I could. But the biggest thing is, don’t give up. If you have a dream and you wanna be that person, go for it. Don’t let anybody cut you down, and I’ve had a lot of people cut me down over the years, and it does nothing but hurt you. But in the end, if you wanna play, play. Don’t let anyone stop you.

If anyone on here enjoys rock music, then please check out my solo music project Cathartic Catapult

The first few songs are demos from my upcoming album, “Daybreak”, and all the songs starting with “Little Ant” are from my 2010 solo album called “Your Evil Broken World”

If you like Marilyn Manson, My Chemical Romance, Avenged Sevenfold, Green Day, or The Rocket Summer, then I believe you may enjoy my music as those are my main influences. I would call my genre simply, “rock”, but there’s a lot of metal in there as well as a good deal of melodic singing. Thank you!

I believe I have previously mentioned that certain albums/bands remind me of the foods I was consuming when I first received their sonic magic into my ear drums. Well, the “shock rocker” Marilyn Manson will always remind me of meatloaf. My mother made it for me when I first discovered his eat me drink me album through his MySpace page. It never ceases to amaze me how fitting that is….meatloaf and Marilyn Manson. This is because, no matter what your opinion of his controversial band may be, it cannot be denied that it consists of SUBSTANCE, RICHNESS, MEAT (the obvious depth of his lyrics and imagery as well as a disgusting incident with a fan that he recalled in his autobiography), LIFE, SACRIFICE, and blood. This probably sounds silly so I may as well move on to the review itself (but not before explaining one more thing about the meat/Manson connection, also found in his autobiography: a quote placed directly before chapter 13 by Roland Barthes: steak is at the heart of meat, it is meat in its purest state; and whoever partakes of it assimilates a bull like strength. The prestige of steak evidently derives from its quasi-rawness. In it, blood is visible, natural, dense, at once compact and section. One can well imagine the ambrosia of the ancients as this kind of heavy substance which dwindles under one’s teeth in such a way as to make one keenly aware at the same time of its original strength and of its aptitude to flow into the very blood of man). Anyway, if you are still reading this, then you are most likely a fan of Marilyn Manson, and most of you would agree with me that the highlight of the groups career was between his very first record  and his sixth(the golden age of grotesque). Many believe that he became “calm” after golden age due to the change in his lyrics from the point of view of an irredeemable monster to a human being full of regret. I myself did not mind this soft side at all, as eat me drink, the album following golden age, is the one I enjoy the most(holy wood is the most well made, but I just like eat me drink me more). But fans were given a taste of the old psychotic Marilyn Manson in his album released before the pale emperor, born villain, which sounded like a blend of antichrist superstar and mechanical animals. Well, for those of you seeking out “hardcore”, this newest album only has one song that can be considered heavy in my opinion (deep six). But that doesn’t mean that it isn’t over the top, vicious, and nasty like his earlier works. It’s got everything that made us love Manson in the first place, but with a new twist: blues rock. Yes, Marilyn Manson has become a blues band, from the guitars to the drums to the vocals. And it sounds amazing. Think about it…rock and roll originally began with the blues anyway. So what Manson has done with this record is, as usual, quite intelligent. But what many fail to realize is that although mr warner(Manson Himself) is the primary factor of the band’s imagery and success, most of the songs were written musically by his band mates. In the past, twiggy ramirez(real name jeordie white) has written some of the coolest bass grooves and guitar licks of rock and roll, but this time around the music was composed by Tyler bates, writer of the score to the new guardians of the Galaxy film. I have yet to see this movie, but from his jangly guitar riffs and funky basslines in the pale emperor it is obvious that he is a very talented musician. As for Manson himself, his blues infused voice has never sounded better. It is still very eery and the lyrics are of course loaded with violence, profanity, and negativity, but the way he sings against the awesome sounding instruments provides for a surpringly upbeat rock record. This isn’t the old Marilyn Manson, but I believe diehard fans will still find it to be a good listen. Critics love it, calling it the best album produced by Manson in over a decade, and I have to agree with them. But I will go a step further. Eat me drink me is still my favorite, but the pale emperor is actually a very close second; even better than holy wood and mechanical animals. And, if you are a Manson fan, you know that that is a huge deal. Very huge. Long live the real king of rock. Ten out of ten stars