Posts Tagged ‘Bring me the horizon’

It was announced recently that the metal core outfit known as Underoath is no longer a Christian band. This shocked the Hell out of many, myself included, but it only took a trip through the rest of their albums for me to realize they’ve been wrestling with the issue for a long time (especially in the last one “Disambiguation”) – discs riddled with doubt and uncertainty, even from the beginning.

While their new record, “Erase Me” does explore issues of questioning (in ways that outdo both Bring Me the Horizon and Marilyn Manson), it is far from blasphemous. There are enough “God save me” references to satisfy any Christian…or, better put, any hopeful spiritual person…There’s a lot on this disc that Fundamentalists would have a big problem with. But that’s rock and roll. That’s art. And though I believe in Jesus Christ as my savior, I am still happy to call this album the best set of songs I have heard since 2010 (Danger Days….).

There is so much raw authenticity to this disc…whether it’s Spencer’s chaotic vocals digging deep into the subject of depression, Aaron’s beautiful vocals that sound like fucking harmonies even when there’s only one vocal track, Chris’ innovative keyboards that can go from Skrillex to Beetheoven at the drop of a hat, Grant’s chugging bass lines that practically break the windows of my car, or Tim and James’ relentless guitars that go from mellifluous harmony to relentless assault within the span of a second.

This is CLASSIC Underoath. The darkness of Define the Great Line, the rawness of Lost in the Sound of Separation, the experimental tones of Disambiguation, and the heartfelt honesty of They’re Only Chasing Safety (Oath abandoned the black metal of Cries of the Past days long ago…but, surprisingly, this shit has the energy of that disc as well…fast, double bass, metal riffs, and less focused, more cathartic screams in some places). The best description I can think of for this album is that it’s like They’re Only Chasing Safety, but more mature, and way, way heavier. Digitized intros and bridges, industrial drum beats with just enough metal to assault the ears, beautiful clean vocals, and heavy screams that put all other “screamers” to shame –

this is Underoath.

This is the band that created the metal core genre…perhaps not literally, but definitely in that the style they created is what everyone else followed. So many bands reap the benefits from the ingenuity of Underoath (and I love them, and none are by any means ripoffs, but it’s true…Underoath are like the Beatles of metal core) – Memphis Mayfire, Blessthefall, Escape the Fate (some of it), Alesana, A Skylit Drive, Bring Me the Horizon, and so many more.

What’s crazy though is how DIFFERENT this effort manages to be while still remaining true to the style of what came before it. There are BALLADS now, along with punk rock (In Motion). “No Frame” is the most innovative thing I have ever heard from Underoath…it still sounds like them, but they have literally never written a song like this one before – the only thing I can compare it to is some of the spacey stuff from Thirty Seconds to Mars, but BETTER. And it’s not just this song – so much of this record is experimental, and while we’ve heard similar sounds before, it still pulls off the feeling of being fresh and unique.

I literally find no fault whatsoever with this album. It is perfect from start to finish.

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Greetings, lovers of rock! As usual, this album review of mine is very late. I sometimes wonder if many people are even still talking about the albums I review(though they should, because I only review important albums). One exception was my pale emperor review, which was written fairly near the release date(not sure when I posted it). Anyway, in keeping with my “tradition” of pairing albums with food that reminds me of the band, I will say that bring me the horizon reminds me of… Well, meat I guess. But mainly discovering them at hot topic. So I guess I wasn’t eating anything when I first heard them, unlike with all my other favorite bands. But who cares? SEMPITERNAL is a fantastic album. I could almost say monumental(don’t worry, I will be a critic at some point and review bad albums). Beginning with the album prior to this one, bmth started to focus more on melody than heaviness(about the hot topic thing…I don’t group music into terms like emo very much, but everyone thinks hot topic is the epitome of “emo”. Well BMTH can’t be accused of that. They haven’t worn makeup as far as I know, just blood, and they look and sound more like a cannibal corpse type than anything else). The opener, “can you feel my heart initially surprised me with a dancy poppy feel. Like most of the other tracks, it will blast away your speakers and bass more than most rock music is capable of doing. What’s surprising is that even with a pop sound these guys still sound pretty hardcore(it’s a different case with their next album that I will review “that’s the spirit”), especially in songs like shadow Moses. It’s not really like their previous efforts, but the advent of pop and electronic, which was only hinted at previously, really makes this record stand on it’s own. Musically, all the songs possess many intricate layers, ambience, experimenting, and actually beautiful melodies(as stated before, this band’s previous albums were more death metal oriented and although great, didn’t focus too much on melody other than the song “don’t go” off “there is a hell…”) some songs actually sound like feel good rock, but they are easily overpowered by the majority of sadness on this album, whether it be through the sound or especially the lyrics. It’s heartbreaking, with a penchant for the bleak, the deolate, and the unfixable. Obviously, these lyrics were inspired by lead vocalist oli syke’s struggle with drug addiction(he did however get better and proceeded to write with more triumph in the following album “that’s the spirit”). I have suffered addiction personally and can definitely find a common ground with oli in these lyrics of his, as well as in some lyrics that I personally interpret to be about family issues and remorse for actions against family, but that’s just my personal interpretation. Something else really interesting is the guitar work. The guitarist, Lee Malia, while not doing too much when it comes to “hardcore riffs”, plays technically and professionally enough for the notes and chords to still be the main focus under the huge array of electronics on all the tracks. And while I’m not as interested in bass and drums(which is silly of me), the bass and drumming works of Matt Kean and Matt Nicholls, respectively, really give this album a good rhythm. I might rate the album on a whole of four out of five, but due to the sheer emotion it conveys to me, I have to up it to a five. Almost as good as the black parade by mcr, and that’s a big deal to me. Get this album. And don’t be all upset because it doesn’t sound like “sleep with one eye open” or “pray for plagues”(if you do, then you better not listen to their “that’s the spirit” record released a few days ago, unless you can get past head banging and care about melody).