Archive for September, 2015

Greetings, lovers of rock! As usual, this album review of mine is very late. I sometimes wonder if many people are even still talking about the albums I review(though they should, because I only review important albums). One exception was my pale emperor review, which was written fairly near the release date(not sure when I posted it). Anyway, in keeping with my “tradition” of pairing albums with food that reminds me of the band, I will say that bring me the horizon reminds me of… Well, meat I guess. But mainly discovering them at hot topic. So I guess I wasn’t eating anything when I first heard them, unlike with all my other favorite bands. But who cares? SEMPITERNAL is a fantastic album. I could almost say monumental(don’t worry, I will be a critic at some point and review bad albums). Beginning with the album prior to this one, bmth started to focus more on melody than heaviness(about the hot topic thing…I don’t group music into terms like emo very much, but everyone thinks hot topic is the epitome of “emo”. Well BMTH can’t be accused of that. They haven’t worn makeup as far as I know, just blood, and they look and sound more like a cannibal corpse type than anything else). The opener, “can you feel my heart initially surprised me with a dancy poppy feel. Like most of the other tracks, it will blast away your speakers and bass more than most rock music is capable of doing. What’s surprising is that even with a pop sound these guys still sound pretty hardcore(it’s a different case with their next album that I will review “that’s the spirit”), especially in songs like shadow Moses. It’s not really like their previous efforts, but the advent of pop and electronic, which was only hinted at previously, really makes this record stand on it’s own. Musically, all the songs possess many intricate layers, ambience, experimenting, and actually beautiful melodies(as stated before, this band’s previous albums were more death metal oriented and although great, didn’t focus too much on melody other than the song “don’t go” off “there is a hell…”) some songs actually sound like feel good rock, but they are easily overpowered by the majority of sadness on this album, whether it be through the sound or especially the lyrics. It’s heartbreaking, with a penchant for the bleak, the deolate, and the unfixable. Obviously, these lyrics were inspired by lead vocalist oli syke’s struggle with drug addiction(he did however get better and proceeded to write with more triumph in the following album “that’s the spirit”). I have suffered addiction personally and can definitely find a common ground with oli in these lyrics of his, as well as in some lyrics that I personally interpret to be about family issues and remorse for actions against family, but that’s just my personal interpretation. Something else really interesting is the guitar work. The guitarist, Lee Malia, while not doing too much when it comes to “hardcore riffs”, plays technically and professionally enough for the notes and chords to still be the main focus under the huge array of electronics on all the tracks. And while I’m not as interested in bass and drums(which is silly of me), the bass and drumming works of Matt Kean and Matt Nicholls, respectively, really give this album a good rhythm. I might rate the album on a whole of four out of five, but due to the sheer emotion it conveys to me, I have to up it to a five. Almost as good as the black parade by mcr, and that’s a big deal to me. Get this album. And don’t be all upset because it doesn’t sound like “sleep with one eye open” or “pray for plagues”(if you do, then you better not listen to their “that’s the spirit” record released a few days ago, unless you can get past head banging and care about melody).